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The Citizen's Guide to the Supreme Court

Brett and Nazim are two attorneys who hate being attorneys. In lieu of practicing law, they have instead developed a podcast to help make the Supreme Court more accessible to the average person. Each week, Brett and Nazim will discuss current Supreme Court cases and how they affect your daily life, while also ruminating on how their dreams of fame and fortune resulted in jokes about Star Wars and wondering how Ruth Bader Ginsburg thinks about Facebook. This Podcast is for entertainment purposes only and is not legal advice. If anything you hear leads you to believe you need legal advice, please contact an attorney immediately.
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Now displaying: June, 2016

This podcast is for entertainment purposes only and is not legal advice.  If you hear anything that leads you to believe you need legal advice, please contact an attorney immediately.

Jun 26, 2016

This week's episode covers three big cases that were issued in the last week.  Utah v. Strieff seemingly erodes the 4th amendment into a nub, U.S. v. Taylor seemingly destroys federalism, and Kirtsaeng v. Wiley & Sons seemingly opens the gates for frivolous copyright claims.  You; however, luckily have an episode that addresses these concerns in order, for purposes of determining whether or not the sky is truly falling.  Law starts at (3:56).

Jun 23, 2016

Brett and Nazim had some extra time this week, so this episode serves as a supplement to last Sunday's episode on non-SCOTUS decisions, which include the Connecticut assault rifle ban, Justice Thomas' possible retirement, and the Net Neutrality decision in D.C. circuit court.  Law starts at (4:06).

Jun 19, 2016

It's been a boring week in the Supreme Court, so Brett and Nazim cover popular legal cases in lower Federal and State Courts, including the 9th Circuit concealed weapon decision, the Stanford Swimmer Judge controversy, the Google/Oracle slugfest, and a 9-1-1 Operator liability decision out of the 10th Circuit.  The law starts at (7:56), but skipping that far passes our new favorite game "How Many Current Supreme Court Justices Have Seen One Episode of Game of Thrones"?

Jun 15, 2016

This edition of the expedited podcast covers the recent decisions in Puerto Rico v. Sanchez Valle (which held that double jeopardy applied to Puerto Rico), Dietz v. Bouldin (which held that a judge is allowed to call a jury back after releasing them), and Williams v. Pennsylvania (which held that a judge who worked on a death penalty case for the district attorney could not later hear the appeal on that same case.  Law starts at (5:57).

Jun 12, 2016

Admin law gets a bad rap, because it's generally boring and hard to understand, so Brett and Nazim take this week to expound on its many virtues, including what it is, how you can get involved it, and how Courts resolve issues with agency decisions.  After covering the Chevron decision in record time, Brett and Nazim cover United States Army Corps v. Hawkes, which deals with the travails of purchasing land subject to the Clean Water Act.  Law basically starts at (2:32) and there's a five minute tangent about Peanut Butter and the song Under Pressure around (19:21).

Jun 12, 2016

We welcome Nazim back from vacation this episode, and to cover their butts for episodes recorded four weeks ago, Brett and Nazim cover U.S. Army Corps v. Hawkes (which was covered in the last episode on admin law) and Foster v. Chatman (which deals with racial considerations in jury selection).

Jun 5, 2016

This week's episode covers the contentious topic of eminent domain, which is the when the government is permitted to use or take your Property.  Brett and Nazim cover how that is done directly as seen in Kelo v. City of New London, and indirectly by way of the Takings Clause as seen in the upcoming case Murr v. Wisconsin.  The Law starts at (5:00), and Brett shares his world famous pasta sauce recipe at (15:00).

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